do you know what it's worth?

this past weekend, my good friend (and extremely talented weaver/dip dyer) jess of whisker row and i participated in our local craft fair. at the beginning of the second day, a woman came in and was really interested in one of jess's dip-dyed pieces. after she looked at the price tag, she asked us when the fair was over and if we were going to be trying to move things by the end of the day. knowing that this meant 'discount', we were both a little surprised by the question. jess answered politely that she also had an etsy shop and that these pieces were all her inventory from that, so no, she wouldn't be pricing anything down at the end of the day. like a garage sale.

photo by Jess Macy

photo by Jess Macy

if you've been following along on my instagram for longer than a day, you'll recognize the KC coasters that i had made for the fair. i seriously love them and got a really amazing response when i teased them last week from the press shop where they were being made. i was feeling so good about them going into the weekend, went back and forth on how much i should sell them for, and then? i sold two sets. the whole weekend, 2 sets. to a sweet friend of mine. i priced them down twice during the course of the fair, but still didn't sell more. this is the nature of the beast, i'm told. i understand that, but i also have a little bit of a rebellious streak that makes me want to scream. so instead of doing that, i thought i'd hop on my high horse real quick and explain something. or ask a question. 

what do people think they're buying when they come to a maker craft fair? i honestly don't know what a non-maker is thinking when they browse the stalls, loving the art that they see, but then turning up their noses at the prices. do they understand that there's a person behind the art? that someone mixed ink by hand, set up a press plate to the millimeter so it would print and cut exactly right, moved levers, adjusted pressure and weight, and then stood there the whole time and made sure that almost every single coaster came out right? or that a real person took a skein of yarn, cut literally hundreds of pieces to the same length, knotted each of those pieces onto a pipe, and then precisely dyed them BY HAND to produce a beautiful pattern? it's art. it may or may not be your thing, but people have to understand that art is a person. someone has created that piece because they love what they do and want to share it. there's a process and if you love what you see, it's worth it, whatever that price is. if you don't feel like paying for it, go to hobby lobby.